Title of Ganjshakar

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First Story

According to Siar-ul-Arifin, when Baba Fariduddin was under the spiritual training of his Pir-o-Murshid, Hazrat Khwaja Qutbuddin Bakhtiar Kaki at Delhi, he was asked to fast for 7 days at a stretch. One day, during this period, when he was proceeding from his hujra' (cell) in Ghuzni Gate towards Hazrat Khwaja Qutbuddin's Khanqah (monastery), his foot accidentally slipped in a marshy pothole and he fell down in the mud, some of which entered into his mouth which, by the grace of God, became sugar. When he related this incident to his Pir, Hazrat Khwaja Qutbuddin, the saint said: "If mud has become sugar in your mouth, then God most gracious will make you a very sweet personality and you will become sweet-tongued for the benefit of the people." After this incident, people began to call him 'Ganjshakar'. ("Ganj" in Persian means 'treasure' and 'Shakar" means 'sugar')

Second Story

According to Siar-ul-Aqlaah, once Baba Fariduddin was on a continuous fast for several days and did not get anything to eat to break the fast at the time of 'Iftaar'. During the night, in a state of acute hunger, he put a few small particles of stone into his mouth which immediately became particles of sugar. When news reached his Pir, Hazrat Qutbuddin, he said: "Farid is a treasury of sugar".

Third Story

Referring to "Tazkarat-ul-Aashqeen" the author of "Khazinat-ul-Asfiar" writes: "A trader was taking a caravan of camels laden with bags of sugar from Multan to Delhi. When he was passing through Ajodhan (now Pakpattan), Hazrat Baba Fariduddin casually asked him as to what was he carrying on his camels? The trader foolishly replied, "it is salt".

Hazrat Baba Farid affirmed: "Yes, it may be salt". When the trader reached Delhi, he was perturbed to find that all his bags of sugar had turned into salt. He immediately returned to Ajodhan and apologised before Baba Farid for his impertinent behaviour. Baba Farid said: "If it was sugar then it shall be sugar." The trader returned to Delhi and was pleased to find that the salt had turned into sugar by the grace of God. This was the third confirmation of his title as Ganjshakar.

The famous poet Bairam Khan, Khan-e-Khanaan, has mentioned this miracle of the saint in a Persian couplet:

Kaan-e-Namak, Juhaan-e-shakar, shickh-e-bahr-o-bur,

Aan kaz shakar namak kunad-o-azz namak shakar.

The great saint (Hazrat Baba Farid) who rules over both the seas and the land,

is a mine of salt and a world of sugar, because he turns sugar into salt and salt into sugar.

Fourth Story

During a period when Hazrat Baba Farid was wandering though jungles and mountains, practising his devotional mujahedas, one day, tortured by intense thirst, he went to a well in order to get some water. But he had neither any rope nor a bucket to draw out water from the well. As he was standing helplessly disappointed, he saw two deers approaching the well with water swelling up to its brim. The deers drank the water then went away. However, when Hazrat Baba Farid went near the well to retrieve water, it subsided.

He was surprised to see this phenomenon and, raising his face towards the sky, complained; "O God gracious, you provided water to those animals but deprived a human being of it." A 'nida' (divine voice) sounded: "Because the animals trusted Us and depended upon our mercy, they, got the water, but because you depended upon the rope and the bucket, you were deprived as you had no faith in Us." Hearing this, Baba Farid felt extremely sorry and ashamed. He went away and started a 40 day fast of repentance a jungle during which period he did not drinking a drop of water. When this fast was over, he put some dust into his mouth which immediately turned into sugar. At this time, he again heard a 'nida' which declared:

O Farid, We have accepted your chilla (40 days fast) and have selected you as one of Our beloved friends. We have included you among our sweet tongued devotees and have made you 'Ganjshakar'.
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